Version Played: Xbox One (via Game Pass) – Available on: Xbox One, PS4, Switch, PC and Mobile

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening.

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening. Only instead of time resetting at the end of every day, it resets every sixty seconds.

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening, only instead of time resetting at the end of every day, it resets every sixty seconds. At the end of the sixty seconds, your character dies and wakes up in bed again, with the clock ticking down for sixty seconds again.

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening, only instead of time resetting at the end of every day, it resets every sixty seconds. At the end of the sixty seconds, your character dies and wakes up in bed again, with the clock ticking down for sixty seconds again. You can keep objects found between sessions, or even find a new home to start the new day from.

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening, only instead of time resetting at the end of every day, it resets every sixty seconds. At the end of the sixty seconds, your character dies and wakes up in bed again, with the clock ticking down for sixty seconds again. You can keep objects found between sessions, or even find a new home to start the new day from. This allows you to make small steps of progress every time you die and the clock resets.

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening, only instead of time resetting at the end of every day, it resets every sixty seconds. At the end of the sixty seconds, your character dies and wakes up in bed again, with the clock ticking down for sixty seconds again. You can keep objects found between sessions, or even find a new home to start the new day from. This allows you to make small steps of progress every time you die and the clock resets. You’d think this would become annoying, like someone trying to repeat the trick in the format of a review.

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening, only instead of time resetting at the end of every day, it resets every sixty seconds. At the end of the sixty seconds, your character dies and wakes up in bed again, with the clock ticking down for sixty seconds again. You can keep objects found between sessions, or even find a new home to start the new day from. This allows you to make small steps of progress every time you die and the clock resets. You’d think this would become annoying, like someone trying to repeat the trick in the format of a review. Unlike this review, however, Minit is utterly captivating and ridiculously compelling.

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening, only instead of time resetting at the end of every day, it resets every sixty seconds. At the end of the sixty seconds, your character dies and wakes up in bed again, with the clock ticking down for sixty seconds again. You can keep objects found between sessions, or even find a new home to start the new day from. This allows you to make small steps of progress every time you die and the clock resets. You’d think this would become annoying, like someone trying to repeat the trick in the format of a review. Unlike this review, however, Minit is utterly captivating and ridiculously compelling. Sure, there are times where you don’t quite have enough time to make any progress, but most of the time you’ll be pushing forward into new areas or starting from a base way further down the line than the one you initially started from.

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening, only instead of time resetting at the end of every day, it resets every sixty seconds. At the end of the sixty seconds, your character dies and wakes up in bed again, with the clock ticking down for sixty seconds again. You can keep objects found between sessions, or even find a new home to start the new day from. This allows you to make small steps of progress every time you die and the clock resets. You’d think this would become annoying, like someone trying to repeat the trick in the format of a review. Unlike this review, however, Minit is utterly captivating and ridiculously compelling. Sure, there are times where you don’t quite have enough time to make any progress, but most of the time you’ll be pushing forward into new areas or starting from a base way further down the line than the one you initially started from. Despite – or perhaps because of – the ever ticking clock and the bite sized nature of each attempt, you’ll often be playing for far longer than you may expect.

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening, only instead of time resetting at the end of every day, it resets every sixty seconds. At the end of the sixty seconds, your character dies and wakes up in bed again, with the clock ticking down for sixty seconds again. You can keep objects found between sessions, or even find a new home to start the new day from. This allows you to make small steps of progress every time you die and the clock resets. You’d think this would become annoying, like someone trying to repeat the trick in the format of a review. Unlike this review, however, Minit is utterly captivating and ridiculously compelling. Sure, there are times where you don’t quite have enough time to make any progress, but most of the time you’ll be pushing forward into new areas or starting from a base way further down the line than the one you initially started from. Despite – or perhaps because of – the ever ticking clock and the bite sized nature of each attempt, you’ll often be playing for far longer than you may expect. Minit has a wonderfully minimalist aesthetic and is a clear example of a simple concept, brilliantly executed.

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening, only instead of time resetting at the end of every day, it resets every sixty seconds. At the end of the sixty seconds, your character dies and wakes up in bed again, with the clock ticking down for sixty seconds again. You can keep objects found between sessions, or even find a new home to start the new day from. This allows you to make small steps of progress every time you die and the clock resets. You’d think this would become annoying, like someone trying to repeat the trick in the format of a review. Unlike this review, however, Minit is utterly captivating and ridiculously compelling. Sure, there are times where you don’t quite have enough time to make any progress, but most of the time you’ll be pushing forward into new areas or starting from a base way further down the line than the one you initially started from. Despite – or perhaps because of – the ever ticking clock and the bite sized nature of each attempt, you’ll often be playing for far longer than you may expect. Minit has a wonderfully minimalist aesthetic and is a clear example of a simple concept, brilliantly executed. It’s one of those concepts that feels as if it should have been done before.

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening, only instead of time resetting at the end of every day, it resets every sixty seconds. At the end of the sixty seconds, your character dies and wakes up in bed again, with the clock ticking down for sixty seconds again. You can keep objects found between sessions, or even find a new home to start the new day from. This allows you to make small steps of progress every time you die and the clock resets. You’d think this would become annoying, like someone trying to repeat the trick in the format of a review. Unlike this review, however, Minit is utterly captivating and ridiculously compelling. Sure, there are times where you don’t quite have enough time to make any progress, but most of the time you’ll be pushing forward into new areas or starting from a base way further down the line than the one you initially started from. Despite – or perhaps because of – the ever ticking clock and the bite sized nature of each attempt, you’ll often be playing for far longer than you may expect. Minit has a wonderfully minimalist aesthetic and is a clear example of a simple concept, brilliantly executed. It’s one of those concepts that feels as if it should have been done before. Unlike this review, which I’m sure you’re already bored of.

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening, only instead of time resetting at the end of every day, it resets every sixty seconds. At the end of the sixty seconds, your character dies and wakes up in bed again, with the clock ticking down for sixty seconds again. You can keep objects found between sessions, or even find a new home to start the new day from. This allows you to make small steps of progress every time you die and the clock resets. You’d think this would become annoying, like someone trying to repeat the trick in the format of a review. Unlike this review, however, Minit is utterly captivating and ridiculously compelling. Sure, there are times where you don’t quite have enough time to make any progress, but most of the time you’ll be pushing forward into new areas or starting from a base way further down the line than the one you initially started from. Despite – or perhaps because of – the ever ticking clock and the bite sized nature of each attempt, you’ll often be playing for far longer than you may expect. Minit has a wonderfully minimalist aesthetic and is a clear example of a simple concept, brilliantly executed. It’s one of those concepts that feels as if it should have been done before. Unlike this review, which I’m sure you’re already bored of. I’m sure it’s taken you a few minutes at least to read, in which time you could have attempted to save the world in Minit more than once.

Imagine a mashup of Groundhog Day and Link’s Awakening, only instead of time resetting at the end of every day, it resets every sixty seconds. At the end of the sixty seconds, your character dies and wakes up in bed again, with the clock ticking down for sixty seconds again. You can keep objects found between sessions, or even find a new home to start the new day from. This allows you to make small steps of progress every time you die and the clock resets. You’d think this would become annoying, like someone trying to repeat the trick in the format of a review. Unlike this review, however, Minit is utterly captivating and ridiculously compelling. Sure, there are times where you don’t quite have enough time to make any progress, but most of the time you’ll be pushing forward into new areas or starting from a base way further down the line than the one you initially started from. Despite – or perhaps because of – the ever ticking clock and the bite sized nature of each attempt, you’ll often be playing for far longer than you may expect. Minit has a wonderfully minimalist aesthetic and is a clear example of a simple concept, brilliantly executed. It’s one of those concepts that feels as if it should have been done before. Unlike this review, which I’m sure you’re already bored of. I’m sure it’s taken you a few minutes at least to read, in which time you could have attempted to save the world in Minit more than once. What are you waiting for?

If you’ve enjoyed reading this – or any of my other content – it’d be much appreciated if you’re able to share this article via social media. I’d also be forever grateful if you’re able to support me via: Ko-Fi.com/geekmid or PayPal – all of my work is provided for free and I earn no income from the blog, so any donations are gratefully received and assist me in keeping my writing dream alive. Above all else though, thanks for reading – I truly appreciate it!

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